EU2015.LV_CMYK_250

Open Europe: Open Data for Open Society

International Conference

February 19, 2015

University of Latvia, 19 Raiņa Blvd., Rīga

 

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About International Expert Panel Discussion, February 18, 2015, Jelgava

Programme

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8:30-9:00 Registration

9:00-9:15 Opening

Main Session  Video

9:15-9:45  Dr. Georg Hittmair, Lawyer, Member of PSI Alliance.  Implementation of the new PSI directive- objectives and preconditions from a business perspective

9:45-10:15 Joonas Pekkanen, Chairman of Avoin Ministeriö, or Open Ministry, E-petitions and open data: what works in Finland?

10:15-10:45  Ian Makgill, Managing Director​ of Spend Network Building a business from open data

10:45-11:00 Coffee

11:00-11:30 Henry Nash, OpenStack Architect, IBM. IBM & OpenStack: Contributions, Commitments and Products

11:30-12:00 Dr. Bastiaan van Loenen, Associate Professor, Faculty of Architecture and The Built  Environment Delft, University of Technology; Deputy-Director of the TU Delft Knowledge Center on Open Data. The end of open data as we you know it today: the case of geographic data (presentation part1, part2)

12:00-12:30 Dr. Karel Charvat, Project manager of Czech Centre for Science and Society, WirelessInfo, Help Service Remote Sensing and Baltic Open Solution Centre and vice chairman of Club of Ossiach. Open Geospatial Data Initiatives (presentation part1, part2)

12:30-13:00 Award of Latvian Open Technology Association

13:00-14:00 Lunch

Session I Video

14:00- 14:30 Rosana Lemut-StrleA Cofounder of the Institute for Privacy and Access to Information – Info House.  Personal data protection a challenge or merely an obstacle for open data

14:30-15:00 Nuria de Lama, Representative of Atos Research & Innovation to the European Commission. Europe: Big Data Challenges and Opportunities

15:00-15:15 Coffee

15:15-15:45  Freyja Van den Boom, Legal Researcher at ICRI/CIR. Legal barriers to access and re-use

15:45-16:15  Dr Rabih Bashroush, Director of the Software Architecture Research Group, University of East London. Towards an Organisational Open Data Maturity Model

16:15-16:45 Toms Ceļmillers,    Senior Consultant of Information Society Policy Division, Electronic Government Department, Ministry of Environmental Protection and Regional Development of the Republic of Latvia.  Policy planning of open data and public sector information re-use

 

Session II Video

14:00- 14:30 Iveta Kažoka, Policy analyst for Centre for Public Policy PROVIDUS. European Citizens’ Initiative: what’s next?

14:30-15:00 Aigars Jaundālders, Member of Board of Latvian Open Technology Association. Open Data for Open Europe: expert panel summary and vision looking forward

15:00-15:15 Coffee

15:15-15:45 Dr. Māris Alberts, Head of  Real Time Systems Laboratory, Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Latvia Latvia goes to Open Data society via European Research projects (presentation part1, part2)

15:45-16:15 Mārtiņš Štāls , Head of Information Systems Development and Support, Register of Enterprises of Republic of Latvia. Implementation of PSI directive at Register of Enterprises of Republic of Latvia

 

16:45-17:00 Conclusion and Networking with a glass of wine

Language: English

Experts and Presentations

Dr. Māris Alberts (Latvia)

Maris_Alberts_1Head of  Real Time Systems Laboratory, Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Latvia

Dr.Maris Alberts is  Head of Real Time Systems Lab at the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science, Chairman of the Board of Technology Development Forum, Latvian Lead Delegate at the Board of ECSEL (Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership) Joint Undertaking, Visiting Associated Professor at Vidzeme University College, Owner of farm “Alberti”. He has managed several FP7 and ERDF funded projects.

 

Latvia goes to Open Data society via European Research projects

Latvian Open Technology Association (LATA) wholly endorses the objectives of e-Europe including the Open Data strategy. Latvian ICT professionals agree  that civil society needs data to be used, re-used and redistributed freely without any legal, technological or social restriction.  Latvian civil society must have the right to participate in economic and political processes.  To implement this right Latvian public and private bodies as partners are participating in several  EU funded projects dealing with different aspects of Open Data, for example, SmartOpenData, FOODIE, SDI4Apps and OpenTransportNet.  It is obvious that neither any structural reforms, nor changes in education system can be implemented without opening all data that have been created using public money.  The current situation when public bodies are selling and buying public data to/from each other is  nightmarish, and such situation shall be changed as soon as possible.

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Dr Rabih Bashroush (United Kingdom)

rabishDirector of the Software Architecture Research Group, University of East London

Dr Rabih Bashroush is a Faculty member at the University of East London (UEL), where he also leads the Software Architecture Research Group. His main research interest is in Cloud Computing and Energy Efficiency. He initially worked within the UK e-Science programme, and was involved with several EU funded research projects, including FP6 GridCoord and FP7 PEDCA. He is now coordinating a new H2020 project on public sector procurement of energy efficient ICT solutions. Central to all these initiatives is the push for open access to scientific data and results.

Rabih has worked in the Software industry since 1997 and held various visiting scientist roles at the Software Engineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, USA; Philips Research Labs, Netherlands; and Danfoss Power Electronics, Denmark. Dr Bashroush serves on the board of a number of organisations and is a regular speaker at public and private sector events.

Towards an Organisational Open Data Maturity Model

Adopting Open Data will require organisations to consider and rethink various business aspects, from technical to financial and operational. The UK Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs have partnered with the Open Data Institute to create an Open Data Maturity Model, the first draft of which was released earlier this month. This talk will elicit the need for such a maturity model for data publishers and consumers alike, and will provide an overview of the main features of the proposed model.

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Karel Charvat (Czech Republic)

KaarelProject manager of Czech Centre for Science and Society, WirelessInfo, Help Service Remote Sensing and Baltic Open Solution Centre and vice chairman of Club of Ossiach

Education: Mathematical Physical Faculty of Charles University in Prague – Doctor in theoretical cybernetics. Member of CSITA, Former President of European Federation for Information Technology in Agriculture Food and Environment (EFITA), evaluator of EC projects. Participants of more then 30 european projects, coordinator or technical coordinator of projects WirelessInfo, PremathMod, NaturNet Redime, Naturnet Plus, FOODIE, SDI4Apps Key qualification: Project management, Open Data, ICT for Agriculture and Environment, International cooperation, SDI design, strategic studies and management of projects in ICT and SDI.

Open Geospatial Data Initiatives

Spatial Data Infrastructures’ (SDIs) main goal is to provide access to geospatial data in a country, across a given area or a domain. It has been estimated that over 80% of all data has a spatial component or dimension. The European SDI (INSPIRE) is based on existing data of Member States. INSPIRE focuses on harmonisation and interoperable exchange of spatial data and services. For this reason, it is necessary to see INSPIRE in relation with two other initiatives including GEOSS and Copernicus (former GMES). Next to the INSPIRE, Copernicus and GEOSS, there are many voluntary initiatives supporting building of different parts of SDI. The SDI world is changing with the development of new GNSS devices, smartphones, mobile cameras and tablets. More and more localised information is collected by citizens. Presentation will be focused on comparison of different initiatives in Europe on Worldwide, on advantage of open geospatial data for business and also on presentation of potential profit of public sector from voluntary innitiatives.

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Toms Ceļmillers (Latvia)

tomsSenior Consultant of Information Society Policy Division, Electronic Government Department, Ministry of Environmental Protection and Regional Development of the Republic of Latvia

Toms Ceļmillers has been working with e-government issues for about 7 years,  in areas of state information systems, electronic services, electronic signatures & documents and general planing of e-government policies and legislative acts. Lately he has been involved in work on implementing amendments EU Directive on the re-use of public sector to Latvian legislation that should point the government institutions to the direction of providing data in open form.

Policy planning of open data and public sector information re-use

Brief overview of work that has been done so far on policy planning of open data and public sector information re-use. Challenges that lay ahead before providing the data in open form.

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Nuria de Lama (Spain)

Advisory Boards meeting - 23.05.2013Representative of Atos Research & Innovation to the European Commission

Nuria de Lama studied Telecommunications Engineering at the Polytechnic University of Madrid. She has been working for 15 years in Research & Development in IT in different environments. After several years managing the department of International projects in an SME specialized in wireless and mobile technologies, she joined Atos in 2005, where she first led a Research Unit on Rural and Industrial development. In 2006 she was appointed Head of the Research unit on Semantics, Software and Service Engineering and since 2010 she is Representative of Atos Research and Innovation to the European Commission. In that position she is responsible for the coordination of European research activities of Atos at EU level, contributing to the R&D strategy, partnerships and business development. This includes the participation of Atos in strategic initiatives such as Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) and European Technology Platforms (ETP), mainly in the Future Internet and Big Data domains.  She is formal representative of Atos in European Technology Platform on Software and Services (NESSI), the CELTIC Plus Eureka program focused on Telecommunications, member of the Open Innovation Strategy and Policy Group (OISPG) and Vice-Secretary General of the Big Data Value Association. She is an active member of the Future Internet community, coordinating Atos project portfolio in the Future Internet Program, operatively involved in FIWARE (http://www.fi-ware.org/) as Collaboration Officer and member of the Future Internet Steering Board. She has worked as independent expert for the European Commission in many occasions as proposal evaluator, project reviewer and rapporteur, and as a long track record of participation as speaker in international conferences and events.

Europe: Big Data Challenges and Opportunities

The presentation will point out which are the major challenges for Europe regarding Data and specifically Big Data.

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Dr. Georg Hittmair (Austria)

dr georgeLawyer, Member of PSI Alliance

Dr. Georg Hittmair was born in Vienna 1960 and studied law at university Innsbruck (Dr. juris in 1997) where he also did his court internship at the regional court. In 1987 Hittmair started work for a CD pressing plant in Elbigenalp, Tyrol, as project manager for CD-ROM productions. Since then Dr. Hittmair held different professional stations, but all his professional life he was involved in the topic of electronic publishing. He worked as a consultant for CD Rom productions and as general manager of a CD ROM wholesale company. Hittmair started to work for net-value, a Viennese Internet agency in 2000 and he made a decisive contribution to the development of citizen´s service platforms in Austria. After completing his studies with an LLM degree at the University of Economics and Business Administration Vienna he became head of legal and public affairs at Compass, a publishing house based in Vienna. In that function he represents the PSI Alliance in various European networks.

  Implementation of the new PSI directive- objectives and preconditions from a business perspective

The new PSI directive should be transposed into national law by July the 18th by the member states. The main objective of the new provisions is economic growth and job creation in a sustainable PSI ecosystem. Commercial re-users as part of the open data value chain will play a vital part in this ecosystem. As the new directive still allows quite a leeway for interpretation for the member states, the commercial re-users are reluctant when it comes to investment in business models based on PSI. The keynote will name the crucial provisions and explain the needs of commercial re-users within the data value chain.

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Aigars Jaundālders (Latvia)

Aigars_Jaundalders_portrait_6688-600x901Member of the Board of Latvian open technology association and Head of Startup Business Group at DPA

Aigars Jaundālders is Member of the Board of Latvian open technology association and Head of Startup Business Group at DPA (www.dpa.lv). Aigars has not only more than 15 years of experience in various expert groups working on various ICT policy topics, including e-invoicing in the EU, but he is also practicing developer with hands on experience developing and launching software products. Given such a broad engagement scope, Aigars is also among few people who has experienced open data challenges throughout value chain – from policy planning to hands on software development work and customer experience. Aigars is also avid IT security advocate, he believes that we all should stop pretending. IT industry should stop pretending that unrealistic requirements we levy upon users are working (can we really expect anyone to remember unlimited number of 15+ character long passwords?. He is also inventor, author of multiple patents.

Open Data for Open Europe: expert panel summary and vision looking forward

Presentation aims to introduce Open data expert panel summary and vision looking forward.

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Iveta Kažoka (Latvia)

IvetaKazokafotoPolicy analyst for Centre for Public Policy PROVIDUS

Iveta Kazoka is a policy analyst for Centre for Public Policy PROVIDUS, a leading policy think-tank in Latvia. Her spheres of expertise include good governance at both the national and EU level, including citizen engagement in decision-making. She was one of the co-writer of the new law on Latvian citizens’ initiatives. Iveta has been involved in creating several successful Latvian e-participation websites such as, for example, gudrasgalvas.lv. Iveta has also created Democracy One Day Blog (democracyoneday.com) – which is an informal blog dedicated to the world’s most interesting e-initiatives that are already transforming the nature of democracy.

European Citizens’ Initiative: what’s next?

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Fiona Krakenbürger (Germany)

FionaKCommunity Organizer, Code for Germany | Open Knowledge Foundation 
Fiona Krakenbürger is a Community Organizer in the program „Code for Germany“. She supports and manages a community of 200 volunteer developers, designers and storytellers across Germany, that build Civic Tech, Apps and Visualizations with Open Data. Ms Krakenbürger has a background in European Ethnology with a focus on digital practices and transformations. Since several years she has been active as an advocate of digital literacy in Germany, discussing and promoting the importance of IT knowledge for society and developed different formats to make knowledge about technology more accessible.

Open Data and Civic Tech for the people, by the people: Code for Germany

In 2014 the Open Knowledge Foundation started the program „Code for Germany“ and thus became part of the international “Code for All“ network by Code for America.
The program aims at fostering the development of Open Data in Germany and launched 13 Open Knowledge Labs in 13 German cities. In the OK Labs, developers, designers and storytellers meet on a regular basis, to work with Open Data and build meaningful tools, data visualizations and apps that deal with topics, issues and challenges in their cities. By providing a platform for these volunteer Open Data enthusiasts, more than 50 projects have been developed, that show the benefit of Open Data for society. In this presentation, we want to introduce the program, the Labs, their projects and stories, to show, how Open Data can be a great resource for cities and their citizens.

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Rosana Lemut-Strle (Slovenia)

Rosana_02 A cofounder of the Institute for privacy and access to information – Info House; an NGO (www.info-hiša.si).

Rosana Lemut Strle has a Master degree in Law and worked at the Information Commissioner of Republic of Slovenia, as a Deputy Information Commissioner for almost six years. From January 2015 she works in a Law firm and is also a cofounder of an NGO; the Institute for privacy and access to information – Info House. Her professional work is now primarily focused on the personal data protection and access to public information. Before, she worked at the health Insurance Institute of Slovenia as a Director of compulsory health insurance section. She is the author of numerous articles on health insurance, and especially on protection of personal data and freedom of information. She is also active as a lecturer.

  Personal data protection a challenge or merely an obstacle for open data

Personal data protection advocates are not discouraging people from using new technological gadgets, however we like to stress their “dark side” – from the privacy perspective. To make our point we might mark the producers and sellers of diverse technological devices and applications with different, negative adjectives, such as: commercial, bland, exploitative… And now we have gained a competition with the noble cause – with the goal to reuse information available, to make the data available for free for everyone in order to make world more transparent. And among information that is to be reused, there could also be personal data, or the reuse itself might make the information personal (again). Are these situations simply the price for open data or shall we try to find a way in which we will be able to preserve our privacy and data protection without (essentially) reducing the value of open data.

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Ian Makgill (United Kingdom)

Ian_photo

Managing Director​ of Spend Network

​Ian has worked in public sector procurement for over 15 years, and has built www.spendnetwork.com a tool where anyone can explore UK spending data and EU procurement data. Spend Network is one of the Open Data Institute’s start up businesses and has been called one of the most innovative companies in the UK by the Government.

  Building a business from open data

For open data to really succeed it must create products​ and jobs, but building a business on a free resource appears counter-intuitive, so how can we create great businesses with open data?

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Henry Nash (United Kingdom)

henry1OpenStack Architect, IBM
Henry works in IBM’s Cloud division as an OpenStack Architect and a core contributor to OpenStack Keystone, driving enterprise capabilities into OpenStack as well as IBM’s products that use OpenStack. He has a long history in the creation of enterprise software, having founded a number of successful companies in Europe and USA, coming to IBM via acquisition in 2009. He holds a 1st class honours degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Southampton, UK.

 

IBM & OpenStack: Contributions, Commitments and Products

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Joonas Pekkanen (Finland)

JoonasChairman of Avoin Ministeriö, or Open Ministry

Joonas Pekkanen is the Chairman of Avoin Ministeriö, or Open Ministry, a non-profit organization based in Helsinki, Finland which facilitates the crowdsourcing of legislation and putting well-prepared law proposals for the consideration of Finland’s Parliament. Joonas is also member of the board of Open Knowledge Finland, which is an association that supports open data, open democracy, open research and all other things open. He is currently engaged in the D-Cent project (http://dcentproject.eu) which aims to provide better tools for coordinating grass-roots civil movements to implement policy change.

E-petitions and open data: what works in Finland?

 

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Mārtiņš Štāls (Latvia)

stalsHead of Information Systems Development and Support, Register of Enterprises of Republic of Latvia.

Mārtiņš Štāls is Head of Information systems development and support at Register of Enterprises of Republic of Latvia. Have previous experience in developing and implementing information systems for local government and government institutions and international private company. Currently working on e‑services for clients of Register of Enterprises and participate in planning a solution to authenticate legal entities. Also has been persistent promoter of Open Data.

Implementation of PSI directive at Register of Enterprises of Republic of Latvia

Before implementing PSI directive, Register of Enterprises of Republic of Latvia had its own model of information re-use. Register of Enterprises had contract with private partner who had exclusive access to the information in exchange of support and development of information technologies that was required for primary information processing. The implementation of PSI directive required to build information technology infrastructure and to define legal and financial aspects of licensing. Now there are three information re‑users that have obtained the licences. Basic information of companies is published daily in machine readable format without any restrictions of accessing or use of information (a.k.a. Open Data).

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Freyja Van den Boom (Belgium)

fvdbResearcher at ICRI/CIR

Freyja van den Boom obtained her Masters in Law (LLM) degree at Tilburg University. Before joining ICRI/CIR in 2014. She worked as a Trademark and Design attorney and legal advisor at one of Europe’s largest consultancies specializing in intellectual property law and as a lecturer Law and Ethics at the Academy of Digital Entertainment. As a legal researcher at ICRI/CIR Freyja focuses on legal issues related to open data, data protection and privacy, liability and intellectual property rights. She is currently doing research on open access to scientific information and Public Sector Information.

  Legal barriers to access and re-use

I will present some of the findings of the LAPSI 2.0 research network on legal issues related to the access and the re-use of Public Sector Information. Relevant position papers and best practices we have identified in the different Member States are available on the website : http://www.lapsi-project.eu/lapsi-20. More specifically I will focus on the issue of legal barriers to access and re-use with a focus on the legal framework for IPR and Data protection with relevance for cultural institutions.

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Dr. Bastiaan van Loenen (Netherlands)

bastianAssociate professor, Faculty of Architecture and The Built  Environment Delft, University of Technology; deputy-director of the TU Delft Knowledge Center on Open Data.

Promoting use of public sector geo-information (PSGI) has been central to Van Loenen’s research. Through cross-jurisdictional comparison he contributes to both the national and international policy debates on access to PSGI and National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI) development. His research is dedicated to the relation between policy choices, quality and use of PSGI, and other aspects that may influence use of PSGI and the development of NSDIs. Bastiaan is chairing the legal and socio-economic committee of the Global Spatial Data Infrastructure Association (GSDI) and chairing the Geo-information infrastructure committee of the Dutch Geodetic Commission, and a member of the Ministry of Economic Affairs OpenGeoData break through team. He participates in the European projects European Location Framework (ELF) and Legal Aspects of Public Sector Information 2 (LAPSI2). He contributed as an expert to the European INSPIRE State of Play project and the eSDInet+ project, and has advised several European countries on INSPIRE implementation. He has (co-)authored over a 100 publications on open data, SDI development, INSPIRE implementation, and legal interoperability issues such as harmonised licensing models and privacy and location data across Europe. Van Loenen was in 2010 awarded the professor J.M. Tienstraprijs for most talented young Dutch researcher in the geo-sciences domain.

  The end of open data as we you know it today: the case of geographic data

Developments in information technology have significantly improved the data’s level of detail, currency, but above all their interoperability. It is currently possible to link a wide variety of data sets at any time, independent from their and your location. Also access to geographic data (geo-data) has never been as easy as today. The widespread use of geo-data may at the same time be in conflict with the individual’s right to information privacy as protected by the EU Data Protection Directive. This directive sets rules to the processing of personal data. At certain levels of positional accuracy, geo-data may identify individuals indirectly. At these levels geo-data may also be considered personal data. Geo-data may be the linking pin between personal and non-personal data. It remains unclear when exactly geographic data should be considered personal data. In our presentation, we argue that these developments extend the reach of EU Data Protection regulations to much more geographic datasets than currently assumed and acted upon. This may result in rethinking either the conditions of access and use for geographic datasets or the concept of personal data as developed under the EU Data Protection Directive.

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